The blog post serves as a follow-up to Deploying MySQL over NFS using the Oracle ZFS Storage Appliance. The benefits remain the same which means this discussion will focus completely on configuring your Oracle ZFS Storage Appliance and database server.

Configuring the Oracle ZFS Storage Appliance

Depending on which block protocol you plan on using, set up target and initiator groups per the following documentation:

These instructions assume you are using a target and initiator group called 'mysql-tgt' and 'mysql-init'

1. From the ZFS controller’s CLI, create a project called ‘mysql’:

        zfs:> shares project mysql

2. Set logbias to latency to leverage write flash capabilities:

        zfs:shares mysql (uncommitted)> set logbias=latency
                               logbias = latency (uncommitted)

3. Commit the settings:

        zfs:shares mysql (uncommitted)> commit

4. Select the 'mysql' project:

        zfs:> shares select mysql

5. Create a LUN called 'innodb-data' to hold data files:

        zfs:shares mysql> lun innodb-data

6. Set the volume block record size to 16K to match Innodb’s standard page size:

        zfs:shares mysql/innodb-data (uncommitted)> set volblocksize=16K
                               volblocksize = 16K (uncommitted)

7. Set the volume size to a value large enough to accommodate your database:

        zfs:shares mysql/innodb-data (uncommitted)> set volsize=1T
                               volsize = 1T (uncommitted)

8. Set the initiator and target groups:

        zfs:shares mysql/innodb-data (uncommitted)> set initiatorgroup=mysql-init
                               initiatorgroup = 1T (uncommitted)
        zfs:shares mysql/innodb-data (uncommitted)> set targetgroup=mysql-tgt
                               initiatorgroup = 1T (uncommitted)
        zfs:shares mysql/innodb-data (uncommitted)> commit

9. Create a LUN called ‘innodb-log’ to hold the redo logs:

        zfs:shares mysql> lun innodb-log

10. Set the volume block record size to 128K:

        zfs:shares mysql/innodb-log (uncommitted)> set volblocksize=128K
                               volblocksize = 128K (uncommitted)

11. Set the volume size to a value large enough to accommodate your database:

        zfs:shares mysql/innodb-log (uncommitted)> set volsize=256G
                               volsize = 256G (uncommitted)
        zfs:shares mysql/innodb-log (uncommitted)> commit

Configuring your database server

1. A directory structure should be created to contain the MySQL database:

# mkdir -p /mysql/san/innodb-data
# mkdir -p /mysql/san/innodb-log
# chown -R mysql:mysql /mysql/san

2. If using iSCSI, login to the ZFS Storage Appliance:

# iscsiadm -m discovery -t sendtargets -p zfssa-ip-address
# iscsiadm -m node -p zfssa-ip-address -login

3. The multipath configuration held in /etc/multipath.conf should contain the following:

defaults {
    find_multipaths yes
    user_friendly_names yes
}
devices {
    device {
        vendor "SUN"
        product "ZFS Storage 7430"
        getuid_callout "/lib/udev/scsi_id --page=0x83 --whitelisted --device=/dev/%n"
        prio alua
        hardware_handler "1 alua"
        path_grouping_policy group_by_prio
        failback immediate
        no_path_retry 600
        rr_min_io 100
        path_checker tur
        rr_weight uniform
        features "0"
    }
}

4. Discover the LUNs with multipath. This may require a restart of the multipath service to take in the new configuration changes.

# multipath -ll
mpatha (3600144f0fa2f948b0000537cdb970008) dm-2 SUN,ZFS Storage 7430
size=1.0T features='0' hwhandler='0' wp=rw
|-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=active
| `-0:0:0:0 sda 8:0   active ready running
|-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled
| `-0:0:1:0 sdc 8:32  active ready running
|-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled
| `-1:0:0:0 sde 8:64  active ready running
`-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled
  `-1:0:1:0 sdg 8:96  active  ready running
mpathb (3600144f0fa2f948b0000537cdbc10009) dm-3 SUN,ZFS Storage 7430
size=256G features='0' hwhandler='0' wp=rw
|-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=active
| `-0:0:0:1 sdb 8:16  active ready running
|-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled
| `-0:0:1:1 sdd 8:48  active ready running
|-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled
| `-1:0:0:1 sdf 8:80  active ready running
`-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled
  `-1:0:1:1 sdh 8:112 active ready running

5. Align each LUN on a 32 byte boundary, specifying multiples of 256 for each partition. This is documented more extensively in Aligning Partitions to Maximize Performance, page 31.

# fdisk -u -S 32 /dev/dm-2
# fdisk -u -S 32 /dev/dm-3

6. Build an XFS filesystem* on top of each LUN for the full device path on the first partition:

# mkfs.xfs /dev/mapper/mpathap1
# mkfs.xfs /dev/mapper/mpathbp1
* XFS is preferred on Linux. ZFS is preferred on Solaris.

7. Mount each LUN either from a shell or automatically from /etc/fstab:

# mount -t xfs -o noatime,nodiratime,nobarrier,logbufs=8,logbsize=256k
 /dev/mapper/mpathap1 /mysql/san/innodb-data
# mount -t xfs -o noatime,nodiratime,nobarrier,logbufs=8,logbsize=256k
 /dev/mapper/mpathbp1 /mysql/san/innodb-log
That's it. Refer to the previous blog post to understand how to setup the MySQL database once these filesystems are mounted. In a future blog post, I'll cover how to backup your MySQL database using snapshots and cloning.

posted by paulie
14:03 PST - February 25, 2015